Tag: culture

Resolutions and Such

Just read a Timbuk2 ad which I found quite clever, and a bit thought provoking.

“Resolutions are typically about things you don’t really want to do”.

timbuck2

Gives me pause, for I find it rather true. The whole notion of resolutions seem to be about things I “should” be doing, or doing better. Rarely have I heard a resolutions about things we love. Perhaps the best resolution, at least the most productive and inspiring one, should be a resolution to do more things I truly love. Or, if you prefer to focus on the negative, resolve to do less things that suck.

Resolving to focus more on the things I love, the things that give me joy, and take the energy away from those things with maximum suck-a-tude? Ok, I guess there’s some joyless tasks we all must do, but give that less energy/less time? That I can rally behind.

Cheers!

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Thoughts on Delta’s CEO “In-flight cell phone calls would be a ‘disruption to the travel experience’

Just read this bit over at Geekwire, and was struck by one key thing.

Delta CEO: In-flight cell phone calls would be a ‘disruption to the travel experience’

Delta CEO Richard Anderson wrote up a memo to 80,000 Delta employees notifying them that even if the U.S. Federal Communications Commission decides to allow cell phone calling in the air, Delta customers won’t be able to do so.

 Makes me wonder how Delta would actually enforce this. Will they re-route their flights and throw someone off the plane who isn’t doing something technically illegal?

More importantly, I expect this to be a lingering hold-out. Once this proverbial “cat it out of it’s bag”, consumers will be expecting to use their phones in flight quite soon. That transition should happen quickly.

For me? I’ll buy noise-cancelling headphones before my next flight.

City of Everett Mayor’s Arts Awards Seeking Nominations

This just came through, posting as is. Great opportunity for the locally artistically inclined.

City seeks nominations for arts awards
2013 Mayor’s Arts Awards and the prestigious Richard Wendt Award of Excellence
Awards recognize Everett’s artists and arts supporters
Deadline:  5 PM, Friday, October 4, 2013
Presentation November 21

For more information and nomination forms, visit www.ci.everett.wa.us/default.aspx?ID=1074.
Contact Carol Thomas, 425-257-7101 cthomas@ci.everett.wa.us

The City of Everett Cultural Arts Commission invites nominations for the 2013 Mayor’s Arts Awards and the prestigious Richard Wendt Award of Excellence.  The awards recognize the accomplishments of artists, arts and cultural organizations and community members committed to enriching the Everett community through the arts.

This is the 21st year of the Richard Wendt Award of Excellence, a lifetime achievement award given to those individuals whose strong support of the arts has been ongoing through philanthropic and volunteer service.

In recognition of Everett’s growing arts community, the commission has created the Mayor’s Arts Awards, which in its fourth year will honor art educators, artists in the community and young artists demonstrating promise and commitment to the Everett arts community.

Nominations must be submitted by 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4.  The Cultural Arts Commission will review the nominations and select the recipients.  The awards, which are non-monetary, are presented annually.

Mayor Ray Stephanson will honor recipients of the 2013 Mayor’s Arts Awards and the Richard Wendt Award of Excellence at a public ceremony on Thursday, Nov. 21.  For more information and nomination forms, visit http://www.everettwa.org/default.aspx?ID=1945.

Past honorees
Past Wendt award recipients include: J. Leach and Vickie Norris, 2012; Janalene Simpson, 2011; Arden Flom, 2010; Marian and Jerry Krell, 2009; Bob and Dona Anderson, 2008; Dr. Richard and Nancy Wendt, 2007; Imagine Children’s Museum, 2006; Clay and Hap Wertheimer, 2005; Terry and Cheryle Earnheart, 2004; Susan Jane Russell, 2003; Arts Council of Snohomish County, 2002; Mike Jordan, 2001; Peter Newland, 2000; John and Idamae Schack, 1999; Dr. Sanford Wright, 1998; Maryalice Salget, 1997; Dr. Paul-Elliott Cobbs, 1996; Dr. Richard Wendt, 1995; Carl Gipson, 1994; Dorothy Jayne Wright, Clyde Revord Motors and Jim Noonan, 1993; and Gene Nastri, 1992.

Past Mayor’s Arts Awards recipients include: Lloyd Weller, Arts Educator; Ron and Ursula Stocke, Artist in the Community, 2012; 20 Riverside, Young Artist; Henrietta Wilson, Arts Educator; Tami Walker and Roxy Gesler, Artist in the Community, 2011; Josey Wise, Young Artist; Shannon Danks, Arts Educator; Liz Geiger, Jane Steele-Meagher and Janet Wold of the Corner Studio and Gallery and Cheri O’Brien, Shari Osti and Evelia Sanchez of the Red Door Gallery, Artist in the Community, 2010.

###City seeks nominations for arts awards
Awards recognize Everett’s artists and arts supporters

EVERETT – The City of Everett Cultural Arts Commission invites nominations for the 2013 Mayor’s Arts Awards and the prestigious Richard Wendt Award of Excellence. The awards recognize the accomplishments of artists, arts and cultural organizations and community members committed to enriching the Everett community through the arts.

This is the 21st year of the Richard Wendt Award of Excellence, a lifetime achievement award given to those individuals whose strong support of the arts has been ongoing through philanthropic and volunteer service.

In recognition of Everett’s growing arts community, the commission has created the Mayor’s Arts Awards, which in its fourth year will honor art educators, artists in the community and young artists demonstrating promise and commitment to the Everett arts community.

Nominations must be submitted by 5 p.m. Friday, Oct. 4. The Cultural Arts Commission will review the nominations and select the recipients. The awards, which are non-monetary, are presented annually.

Mayor Ray Stephanson will honor recipients of the 2013 Mayor’s Arts Awards and the Richard Wendt Award of Excellence at a public ceremony on Thursday, Nov. 21.  For more information and nomination forms, visit http://www.everettwa.org/default.aspx?ID=1945.

Past honorees
Past Wendt award recipients include: J. Leach and Vickie Norris, 2012; Janalene Simpson, 2011; Arden Flom, 2010; Marian and Jerry Krell, 2009; Bob and Dona Anderson, 2008; Dr. Richard and Nancy Wendt, 2007; Imagine Children’s Museum, 2006; Clay and Hap Wertheimer, 2005; Terry and Cheryle Earnheart, 2004; Susan Jane Russell, 2003; Arts Council of Snohomish County, 2002; Mike Jordan, 2001; Peter Newland, 2000; John and Idamae Schack, 1999; Dr. Sanford Wright, 1998; Maryalice Salget, 1997; Dr. Paul-Elliott Cobbs, 1996; Dr. Richard Wendt, 1995; Carl Gipson, 1994; Dorothy Jayne Wright, Clyde Revord Motors and Jim Noonan, 1993; and Gene Nastri, 1992.

Past Mayor’s Arts Awards recipients include: Lloyd Weller, Arts Educator; Ron and Ursula Stocke, Artist in the Community, 2012; 20 Riverside, Young Artist; Henrietta Wilson, Arts Educator; Tami Walker and Roxy Gesler, Artist in the Community, 2011; Josey Wise, Young Artist; Shannon Danks, Arts Educator; Liz Geiger, Jane Steele-Meagher and Janet Wold of the Corner Studio and Gallery and Cheri O’Brien, Shari Osti and Evelia Sanchez of the Red Door Gallery, Artist in the Community, 2010.

Reflections of a “Shusher”

I enjoy Anil Dash’s commentary. His background diverges significantly with mine; he provides me food for thought. His writing challenges the way I see the world. Sometimes with rather profound topics; though, today, he looks at the mundane world of cinema. More specifically, the cultural variation regarding the act of viewing. Read: “SHUSHERS: WRONG ABOUT MOVIES. WRONG ABOUT THE WORLD.

Ok, I assume you finished reading. So, full disclosure, I come out of cultural world of the “shushers”. My norms dictate quiet, church-esque near reverence during cinematic experiences. Mr. Dash’s essay, though, reminds me (with a delightful wit, IMHO) that my view is one built through ONE cultural lens. Not the only one, not the right one, just one. That varying from my norm doesn’t impart inferiority, lower class-ness; simply difference.

I finished with thoughts of “how do we, in this global culture, navigate these differences without clashing too painfully?” Reading some of the comments reinforces that point. It’s very hard for us to break free of our underlying cultural upbringing and see the “other” in a balanced, respectful way. I expect this will be a continuing aggravation to an embracing, diverse and peacefully co-existing society.

Nordic Pride, Or Lingonberries On Your Pancakes Or Die!

Ok, I like lingonberries fine, but maybe not that much. Swedish pancakes are lovely, though.

Anyway, growing up Lutheran, I’ve had a great deal of interaction with Nordic culture. Whether the glorious delights of desserts (yummy lefse), or the abomination that is lutefisk,  I’ve seen a great deal.  Therefore, I, with a deep whole-heartedness, recommend you experience a Nordic heritage event.

Below are two Seattle area ones. I won’t be able to make either this year, but several friends attend them.

Syttende Mai, May 17, Seattle; and Poulsbo Viking Fest, May 17-19

More details here (link is to the Seattle Times):

Beginnings

I hail from Lynnwood, part of Snohomish county, just north of Seattle. My life has been dominated by news, etc, focused on the city ~20 miles to the south. I knew the mayor of Seattle before I knew that Lynnwood had a mayor. Living in the shadow of such a large city has made me wonder how to break free.

Washington is a large state, but you’d think it entailed one city: Seattle. Yet we’re so much more. Bellevue is just across a floating bridge, and quite a different place. Then there’s Spokane, or Yakima, or Walla-Walla, or Everett or Bellingham, or….

These differences are significant. Politically, socially, culturally, even ecologically; each region is different, and dramatically so. The main differentiator, in Washington, seems to be east/west of the Cascade mountain range. Climate-wise, west-side has the rainy disposition that Seattle is famous form. Yet, on the east-side, we have desert; some of the driest places in the country. Economically  the east is predominately agrarian. West is subdivided by Seattle’s influence. The Puget Sound basin is mainly industrial and post-industrial urban work. The rest seems a balance of extraction (timber, mainly) and fishing.

My goal is to expand on the stereotype of this region. Show how diverse we are as a state in all manner. I’m glad to have you join my journey.